Category Archives: Nautical History

Astoria Yard’s WW II YMS Minesweepers

AMCCO Shipyard’s Minesweeper (YMS) Production Remembered The 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor last December gives us a chance to review the incredible history of the “war at home” in Astoria—a time when thousands of ordinary women performed … Continue reading

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WW II Minesweeper Tradition Lives on in Seattle

Wooden Hulls Still Restored at Pacific Fishermen Yard Almost every kind of boat imaginable has traveled up and down the Seattle Ship Canal and through the locks over the last 100 years, but few of the thousands of crew or … Continue reading

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Salmon Tender Duke–Oldest Boat on the Columbia River

After 112 Years Afloat, the Duke Retires to Museum in Astoria The older a wooden boat gets, the more work it takes to keep it seaworthy. That’s a lesson that many boatmen learned the hard way. On the lower Columbia … Continue reading

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Frenchman’s Obsession with Slocum and the Spray

In the Wake of the Spray Guy Bernardin is a French racing sailor who had an impressive racing career in the 1980s sailing in the new Open 60 class in the OSTAR, the Route du Rhum, two BOC round-the-world races … Continue reading

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Salmon Fishing on the Columbia–CRFPU, CRPA, Bumble Bee

Note: I compiled this history from many online sources. Salmon was a dietary staple of Northwest aboriginal people. Large, tasty, and available at predictable times and places, the fish were an ideal source of protein, easily caught with basic fishing … Continue reading

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Cruising Puget’s Island and Beyond

The names of the first European explorers are “writ large” all across the charts of the northwest. Spanish, English, Russians, Americans, and a few Frenchmen are immortalized in place names. The most prolific of these navigators was Captain George Vancouver. … Continue reading

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New Bumble Bee T-shirts at Hanthorn Cannery Museum

August 1, 2016, the Hanthorn  Cannery Museum announced that the new Bumble Bee T-shirt will go on sale at the Cannery Workers Reunion on Pier 39,  Astoria on Saturday August 13. The 12th annual reunion will begin after the Regatta Parade and run from 2-5 pm. … Continue reading

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100 Years of History for Seattle’s Ship Canal and Locks

The Lake Washington Ship Canal and the locks that connect Lake Union to Puget Sound is such an integral part of the city that it’s practically impossible to imagine life without them. Whether you are boating, paddling or just strolling … Continue reading

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Is the Columbia Bar the Graveyard of the Pacific?

Whether you visit the mouth of the Columbia by boat or live here as I do, you can’t avoid the constant reminder that the Columbia Bar is the “Graveyard of the Pacific–the most treacherous stretch of water in the world,” … Continue reading

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Cannons in 1846 wreck spent 162 years under Oregon beach

2014 discovery of Cannons Excites Town of Cannon  Beach The two half-ton cannons found on the Oregon coast have returned after a six-year restoration at the Center for Marine Archeology and Conservation at Texas A & M university. They were … Continue reading

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