Category Archives: Nautical History

Cruising Puget’s Island and Beyond

The names of the first European explorers are “writ large” all across the charts of the northwest. Spanish, English, Russians, Americans, and a few Frenchmen are immortalized in place names. The most prolific of these navigators was Captain George Vancouver. … Continue reading

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New Bumble Bee T-shirts at Hanthorn Cannery Museum

August 1, 2016, the Hanthorn  Cannery Museum announced that the new Bumble Bee T-shirt will go on sale at the Cannery Workers Reunion on Pier 39,  Astoria on Saturday August 13. The 12th annual reunion will begin after the Regatta Parade and run from 2-5 pm. … Continue reading

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100 Years of History for Seattle’s Ship Canal and Locks

The Lake Washington Ship Canal and the locks that connect Lake Union to Puget Sound is such an integral part of the city that it’s practically impossible to imagine life without them. Whether you are boating, paddling or just strolling … Continue reading

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Is the Columbia Bar the Graveyard of the Pacific?

Whether you visit the mouth of the Columbia by boat or live here as I do, you can’t avoid the constant reminder that the Columbia Bar is the “Graveyard of the Pacific–the most treacherous stretch of water in the world,” … Continue reading

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Cannons in 1846 wreck spent 162 years under Oregon beach

2014 discovery of Cannons Excites Town of Cannon  Beach The two half-ton cannons found on the Oregon coast have returned after a six-year restoration at the Center for Marine Archeology and Conservation at Texas A & M university. They were … Continue reading

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The Salvage Chief-Still Going Strong at 70

When an empty fuel barge went on the rocks of North Head last month, the US Coast Guard and Washington State Department of Ecology were in charge of a salvage effort led by Sause Brothers (owners of the barge) and … Continue reading

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2015: Fremont Tug’ 100 Years Service on Lake Union

1915 was a big year on Lake Union. The Lake Washington Ship Canal and the Chittenden Locks were about to connect the lakes and northern Seattle with Puget Sound and the Pacific Ocean. Activity on and around the lake had … Continue reading

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2014: “Work is Our Joy” at the Hanthorn Cannery Museum

The Story Of The Columbia River Gillnetter The Columbia River salmon is in trouble, and it’s going to be a long struggle to save any of the remaining runs from extinction. Nowhere is the pinch felt more than in Astoria … Continue reading

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2011: Black Ball’s Port Angeles-Victoria Ferry Coho Turns 50

In 55 Years, MV Coho Has “Never Missed a Day!” As I write this, it’s May and the boating season is well under way in the Pacific Northwest. For the most active sailboat racers, that means they are preparing for … Continue reading

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1992: The COVE System–COre/Veneer/Epoxy

I invented the term “COVE System” in the 1990’s to describe Schooner Creek Boatworks’ wood-composite boat construction method. COVE which stands for COre/Veneer/Epoxy. It  a system that utilizes thin layers of wood for the inner and outer skins and a … Continue reading

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